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Clocks Puzzle Details:

About: Solve this fun new puzzle and put all the clocks featured in this game back together as fast as you can and get your time on our leaderboards. Clocks are in homes, offices and many other places; smaller ones (watches) are carried on the wrist or in a pocket; larger ones are in public places, like railway stations or churches. The invention of the mechanical clock in the 13th century started a change in timekeeping methods from continuous processes, such as the motion of a shadow on a sundial or the flow of liquid in a water clock, to periodic oscillatory processes, such as the swing of a pendulum or the vibration of a quartz crystal, which is more accurate. All modern clocks use oscillation. In mechanical clocks, the power source is typically either a weight suspended from a cord or chain wrapped around a pulley, sprocket or drum; or a spiral spring called a mainspring. These kind of clocks need to be wound periodically, usually by turning a knob or key or by pulling on the free end of the chain. In electric(digital) clocks, the power source is electricity for either a battery or an AC power line. Have fun!
Puzzle Of The Day On: 02/Nov/2017

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Very Easy Puzzle Time Stats

Best Time
00 : 13
Your Time
Average Time
00 : 34

Easy Puzzle Time Stats

Best Time
01 : 00
Your Time
Average Time
03 : 36

Normal Puzzle Time Stats

Best Time
02 : 41
Your Time
Average Time
17 : 26

Hard Puzzle Time Stats

Best Time
03 : 48
Your Time
Average Time
31 : 49

Very Hard Puzzle Time Stats

Best Time
06 : 04
Your Time
Average Time
52 : 39

Extra Hard Puzzle Time Stats

Best Time
13 : 00
Your Time
Average Time
3 : 05 : 14

Puzzle Leaderboards

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